As with other types of accidents, rollover crashes can happen for a multitude of reasons, and most accidents have numerous causes and factors that all contribute at the same time. Still, it is important to note that there are some common reasons for rollovers. Understanding why they happen can help you understand what to do after an accident.

Alcohol

About 50 percent of rollover accidents are linked back to alcohol in one fashion or another. Even if you weren’t drinking, you could be injured as a passenger in a car that rolled with a drunk driver behind the wheel, or you could be in a second vehicle that was struck by that one.

Style and Design

A vehicle that is thinner or taller may be more likely to roll. A sedan, with a low center of gravity, could hydroplane and skid sideways without rolling, for instance, while an SUV would turn sideways and then flip.

High Speeds

Speed is one of the biggest contributing factors. It can make even a normal maneuver more dangerous. That’s why there are often reduced-speed signs on sharp curves, and drivers that ignore them are more likely to roll when the vehicle can’t navigate the curve that quickly. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has stated that about 75 percent of deadly rollover accidents happen outside of the city, in places with speed limits that are a minimum of 55 mph.

Have you been hurt in a rollover accident caused by another driver, whether you were a driver in another car, a passenger in the same car or a pedestrian who was struck during the crash? If so, you may be able to seek compensation for medical bills, lost wages, the cost of rehab and much more.

Source: Safer Car, “Causes,” accessed Oct. 10, 2016