A jackknifing truck is one of the riskiest road hazards of all because it is essentially a truck that is out of the control of its driver. While cruising down Interstate 10, drivers who encounter this nightmarish scenario are at risk of serious injury — or worse.

Anatomy of a truck jackknifing

Jackknifing is a type of skid a truck goes into after it loses its grip on the road’s surface, similar to hydroplaning on a rain-slick highway. The difference between the two skidding accidents is that a truck’s cab and trailer wind up moving in two opposing directions simultaneously.

Sometimes a negligent or inexperienced truck driver will misapply the brakes and send the rig into a jackknife position. Locking up the brakes only makes the situation deadlier.

Often the trailers swing around and collide with vehicles in other lanes. Head-on collisions sometimes result from jackknifing accidents. Multi-car pile-ups are also common, as drivers in proximity to the jackknifing truck attempt to avoid the debris field from the contents of its trailer.

Jackknifing can occur year-round in all kinds of weather

Some drivers don’t worry about jackknife accidents unless they are driving in snowy or icy conditions — a Houston rarity. But the frequent rains and the Texas-size hail the city has seen both pose risks to truckers and the luckless motorists in their paths.

If you suffered injuries due to a jackknifed big rig on a Texas road, you are likely entitled to pursue the at-fault driver and the company that employs him or her for compensation for your medical bills, pain, suffering and other potential losses.

Source: Bay & Bay Transportation News, “How Truck Drivers Can Avoid Jackknifing,” accessed July 28, 2017