If you are involved in a vehicle rollover, you risk permanent injuries or even death. Vehicle rollovers only occur in a very small percentage of serious accidents. Yet they are responsible for nearly 30 percent of deaths in passenger vehicle crashes.

Rollovers typically happen with tall and narrow vehicles like vans, pickup trucks and SUVs. Rollovers are related to the higher centers of gravity in those type of vehicles. But a rollover is possible with any car or truck under certain circumstances.

Taking a curve too sharply causes a drastic shift in the center of gravity, causing the vehicle to topple and roll when a driver attempts corrective action. A pendulum-type of effect sets in, and lateral force eventually sends it too far in one direction.

Defects in the roads can cause trucks and cars to roll over. Potholes and soft shoulders on the sides of highways are often culprits in rollover accidents.

The design of some vehicles’ tires can cause them to play a significant role in rollovers. When tires grip the road too tightly, too much force on the sides of the vehicle can cause it to roll.

The best way to survive a rollover is to avoid it entirely. That being said, survival rates are obviously higher when the occupants are securely belted in. Another way to be proactive about rollover safety is to avoid overloading your vehicle. Don’t place heavy items on top of an SUV or pickup. Instead, load heavy cargo low inside the vehicle near its center of gravity.

If your rollover accident was caused by a manufacturing or design flaw, or if another driver’s negligence led to it, you may have a cause of action to pursue a claim for damages.

Source: Consumer Reports, “Car rollover 101 How rollovers happen and what you can do to avoid one,” accessed July 07, 2017