Those who study auto accidents have long known there was a correlation between critical injuries and fatalities and vehicle rollover collisions. While this type of crash can cause many different kinds of serious injuries, passengers and motorists are especially vulnerable to spinal, neck and head injuries.

These injuries are all too frequently catastrophic even if they are survivable. Injured victims can wind up paraplegic or quadriplegic or suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBI) that leave them severely brain damaged and dependent on others for the most basic care.

Why are rollover wrecks so dangerous?

Some industry insiders believe that the extent of the vehicle’s roof damage corresponds with the most serious injuries while others dispute it. Researchers conducted a decade-long study using statistics supplied by the National Automotive Sampling System — Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS).

The analysis of the data showed that there was a 64 percent increased risk of potentially fatal injuries with each 10 centimeters of increased crushed vehicle roofs. A control-case analysis indicated only a 44 percent uptick in the odds of suffering spinal, head or neck injuries with each 10 cm of increased crushed automobile roofs.

While falling short of definitive proof that rollover accidents and roof damage have a definite causal link, it does tend to support the hypothesis.

If you get injured in a rollover collision due to an at-fault driver’s negligence, your injuries could be both extensive and expensive to treat. You could be left with life-long disabilities that require 24-hour care by a rotation of attendants and skilled nurses.

Your priority may be to file a personal injury claim against the negligent driver and the auto insurance company that issued his or her policy.

Source: ScienceDirect, “The relationship between vehicle roof crush and head, neck and spine injury in rollover crashes,” Konrad M.Dobbertin, Michael D.Freeman, William E.Lambertcg, Michael R.Lasarevch, Sean S.Kohlesijk, accessed Oct. 06, 2017