With the exception of high-speed, head-on collisions, there are few crashes that are as dangerous as rollover accidents. Whereas most other wrecks involve another vehicle, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the deaths attributable to more than 90 percent of fatal rollover crashes involved single vehicles on a straightaway or in a curve.

These complex crash incidents can be quite violent, which is one reason why there is a higher rate of fatal injuries to the vehicle occupants in a rollover crash. Collision data from fatal accidents determined that these kinds of wrecks account for almost 35 percent of all highway fatalities involving passenger vehicles. In fact, in a single year in the United States in the last decade, there were over 7,600 fatalities from rollovers.

No vehicle make or model is exempt from the risk of rollovers. But research shows that narrow, higher vans, SUVs and pickup trucks with their high centers of gravity have greater chances of flipping over after a crash.

Some of these rollover dangers are attributable to design flaws. In recent years, Chevrolet recalled some of its vehicles due to dangerous fuel leaks that occurred and caused risk of fire after a rollover crash. Owners were advised to take their cars to the dealership for installation of lock-rings on the fuel tanks to protect pressure sensors from damage after the cars were involved in rear-end collisions and rollovers.

Sometimes, however, it is driver distraction or impairment that causes these deadly impacts. In other instances, such as when a driver is speeding, it can be negligence that creates the hazard.

If you suffered injuries from a rollover accident, it may be possible for you to seek financial compensation for your injuries and other damages.